Last edited by Brashicage
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

1 edition of The Eastern Himalayas, where worlds collide found in the catalog.

The Eastern Himalayas, where worlds collide

World Wide Fund for Nature--India

The Eastern Himalayas, where worlds collide

by World Wide Fund for Nature--India

  • 229 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by WWF India in New Delhi .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Other titlesWhere worlds collide
The Physical Object
Pagination28 p. :
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24581515M
LC Control Number2010316522

  A report published today by the WWF, The Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide, lists new types of plants, 16 amphibians, 16 reptiles, 14 fish, two birds and two mammals and 61 new invertebrates. The Himalayas are a prime example of how tectonic plate motion can manipulate the earth in extraordinary ways. These colliding plates resulted in the formation of .

Himalayas: Vulnerable species at mountainous crossroads. A new report by WWF - The Eastern Himalayas: Where Worlds Collide - describes more than new species living at a geographical and ecological crossroad. The Burren: Invasive scrub .   The southern face of Mount Everest, known locally as Sagarmatha, soars above the monsoon clouds Saturday, Aug. 26, at the border of Nepal and Tibet.

The WWF report The Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide details discoveries made by scientists in remote mountain areas now endangered by rising global temperatures, such as a bright green frog (Rhacophorus suffry) which uses its long, red webbed feet to glide in the air. The Eastern Himalayas is home to a staggering.   In the wake of dramatic environmental changes and the NASA reports of a new Asteroid interception mission, shocking future maps of the world created by doomsday theorists are looking more.


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The Eastern Himalayas, where worlds collide by World Wide Fund for Nature--India Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Eastern Himalayas harbor an amazing diversity of life. There are globally threatened species found in the Himalayas, including Asia’s three largest herbivores – Asian elephant, greater one-horned rhinoceros and wild water buffalo – and its largest carnivore, the tiger.

The region is home to: • 10, types of plants • mammals. Himalayas: Vulnerable species at mountainous crossroads.

10/08/ A new report by WWF - The Eastern Himalayas: Where Worlds Collide - describes more than new species living at a geographical and ecological crossroad. Eastern Himalayas. Murat Selam / WWF Nepal. The landscape is vast, rugged and beautiful but it's the diversity of life that is astounding scientists.

The Himalayas, or Himalaya (/ ˌ h ɪ m ə ˈ l eɪ ə, h ɪ ˈ m ɑː l ə j ə /), (Sanskrit: himá (हिम, "snow") and ā-laya (आलय, "receptacle, dwelling")), is a mountain range in Asia separating the plains of the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan range has many of Earth's highest peaks, including the highest, Mount Everest (Nepal/China).The Himalayas include over Coordinates: 27°59′N 86°55′E /.

The report, The Eastern Himalayas- Where Worlds Collide, describes more than new species discovered in the last decade including plants, 16 amphibians, 16 reptiles, 14 fish, 2 birds, 2. But some species are globally threatened with extinction, the Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide report warns, with 14 of them critically endangered.

In the Shadows of Crows. Two Journeys through India One Remarkable Friendship. In the Shadow of Crows is an inspirational account of a young man raised in the suburban comforts of Surrey, a widow ravaged by leprosy in the Eastern Himalaya, and the impact on them both as their worlds collide.

A report released by WWF International yesterday “Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide” makes us realise just how important and fragile the ecosystem of the Himalayas is. It reveals the discovery of over new species of plants and animals in the last ten years. Biodiversity in the Eastern Himalayas: Status, trends and vulnerability to climate change; Climate change impact and vulnerability in the Eastern Himalayas – Technical report 2.

Follow/Fav Two Worlds Collide: The Book of Dragons. By: HawkTooth. particularly eastern European and Asian ranges such as the Himalayas, Karakoram, Hindu Kush, and the Carpathian and Caucasus ranges. A specialist in traversing the steep cliffs and ravines of these sharp-peaked mountains, the Mountainguard is an elusive top predator adapted.

Details of these new discoveries are compiled in the latest WWF report titled "Eastern Himalayas - Where the Worlds Collide" that positions the Eastern Himalayas on par with some of the other global biological hotspots like Borneo.

Materials and methods Study area. The study covers Nepal, a mountainous country in the central Himalayas (26°22′–30°27′ N, 80°4′–88°12′ E) ().Nepal has an impressive network of 20 protected areas (average size: km 2), that includes ten national parks (average size km 2), 3 wildlife reserves (average size km 2), 6 conservation areas (average size km 2) and Cited by: The Eastern Himalayas: Where Worlds Collide immediately attracted the attention of conservation and environmental organizations worldwide, and many of these groups were quick to relate the findings.

The species in this report were identified and. by Hiking Lady Sinceover new species have been discovered in the eastern Himalayas. The World Wildlife Fund published a report this week titled: “Eastern Himalayas: Where Worlds Collide”, and discussed their findings and highlighted why the.

The Eastern Himalayas- Where Worlds Collide describes more than new species discovered – including plants, 16 amphibians, 16 reptiles, 14 fish, 2 birds, 2 mammals and at least 60 new invertebrates. The report mentions the miniature muntjac, also called the “leaf deer,” which is the world’s oldest and smallest deer species.

Overall, from totwo mammals, two birds, 16 amphibians, 16 reptiles, 14 fish, plants and more than 60 invertebrates have been identified in the region, according to the WWF report, The Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide.

World Wide Fund forNature New species discoveries. The Eastern Himalayas—Where worlds collide. WWF Living Himalayas Network Wide Fund for Nature, Thimphu, Bhutan; Kathmandu, NepalNew Delhi, India Google Scholar.

Biodiversity in the Eastern Himalayas: Status, Trends and Vulnerability to Climate Change Book January with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'. EASTERN HIMALAYAS REPORTED BY WWF A report by WWF has revealed more than new species, including a Flying-frog, from the Eastern Himalayas.

The report, The Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide, highlights a host of new species found over the last decade in the remote mountain region spanning Bhutan.

The Eastern Himalayas- Where Worlds Collide describes more than new species discovered – including plants, 16 amphibians, 16 reptiles, 14 fish, 2 birds, 2 mammals and at least 60 new invertebrates. The report mentions the miniature muntjac, also called the “leaf deer,” which is the world’s oldest and smallest deer species.

In a report, The Eastern Himalayas - Where Worlds Collide, the WWF has detailed the discoveries made by scientists from various organisations between and in a region reaching across Bhutan and north-east India to the far north of Myanmar as well as Nepal and southern parts of Tibet.

The Indian Subcontinent was a very fast mover, clipping along at over 4 inches per year. When it slammed into the Eurasian plate over 24 million years ago the collision built the highest mountain range in the world, the Himalayas. In fact, the Himalayas are still climbing higher and higher today.

Math Connection. Read the The World Worldlife Fund's (WWF) report: The Eastern Himalayas – Where Worlds Collide detailing discoveries made by scientists between and Among the finding of many strange animals it also reports the finding of. Two Worlds – The Himalayas and the South Pacific – and Global Warming Posted on Decem by JeffFuchs So much of the time I’ve had here with the East West Center in Honolulu as an invited speaker has been time spent showing, seeing, and being reminded of the very similar plights that people share, while living in very different.